Student Life Section from October 24, 2017

Take the Extra Step: Internship Opportunities Here at CI

By Alana Robinson
alana.robinson628@myci.csuci.edu

Spring 2017 Internship Fair by CI Communications and Marketing
Spring 2017 Internship Fair by CI Communications and Marketing

Interning is one of the most popular job experiences for undergraduate students. These opportunities may be paid or unpaid, part-time or full-time, and on-campus or off-campus. However, they all have one thing in common: supporting students and helping them find their dream career.

Academic credit internships, also known as self-selected or independent internships, are unpaid. As the name states, they provide students with academic credit. Students can obtain an academic credit internship through the applicable faculty chair. Academic internship courses are found in the CI class catalog. There are general internship courses as well as courses specific by major. For example, UNIV 494 is a general internship course.

To find available internships, click on “Dolphin CareerLink” from the myCI page, click on the drop-down menu “Jobs & Internships” and then click on “Jobs.” On the page that pops up, type in the specifics of the internship desired. To find The Henry L. “Hank” Lacayo Institute for Workforce & Community Studies (HLI) Internship Program, go to myCI, and in the search bar at the top right, type in “Hank Lacayo.”

The HLI Internship Program, founded in 2012, is the only paid internship that CI itself offers. It is grant-funded and donation-based. The program was initially set up for students in need. The HLI internship program is like a recruitment center, where they find the right internship for students.

It is a resource to both students and the community, and especially beneficial for minority students, veterans, seniors, those in the labor sector and those in civic leadership. This program provides CI students with paid experience in an occupational setting related to their education and the career they want to pursue.

Henry L. “Hank” Lacayo was an advocate for the people, assisting the labor unions in Los Angeles as a labor union leader. He also served as an advisor to United States presidents and governors, such as former U.S. presidents Jimmy Carter and John F. Kennedy according to a May 2 article on the VC Star website. In 2012 he received an honorary doctorate at CI for helping to create the Henry Lacayo program. Amanda Carpenter, who oversees the Career Center at CI, created the HLI Internship Program.

So, how does the HLI application process work? Students need a resume, a letter of application (i.e. cover letter), a student employment application and a minimum of one letter of recommendation. Be specific, for this internship is tailored to the student’s needs. Getting into this program is very competitive, as only 20 students are selected each semester.

Applications for the HLI Internship Program for the fall of 2018 should be turned in as early as possible. After securing one or more letter(s) of recommendation, students must fill out the online supplemental questionnaire with their email address. Also, students must upload their resume and letter of application to their profile in “Dolphin CareerLink.” It may take a couple days to get these documents approved.

To find out more information on career happenings and internship opportunities, students can go to the Career Center, located in Bell Tower 1548. The next workshop geared towards this subject is the Fall 2017 Career and Internship Fair on Thursday, Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Central Mall. Here students can network with local organizations that are actively recruiting for internship and employment positions. For a list of participating employers, go to go.csuci.edu/cdsnews.

Another Career Center event is Job/Internship Search Strategies. This will be held Thursday, Nov. 2 from 11 a.m. to noon in the Career Center.

For more information on internship opportunities in general, contact the Career Center. Their phone number is (805) 437-3270, and along with regular office hours they also have drop-in career counseling hours.

 

“Hard Things I’m Learning to Say”

By Alex Guerra and Vyctorya Thomas-Vanzant
alex.guerra700@myci.csuci.edu and vyctorya.thomas-vanzant554@myci.csuci.edu

“I’m okay.”

“I’m only human.”

“I am loved.”

These are only a few of the hard things many of us have trouble telling ourselves; some of the things that can poke at us day by day until, finally, we muster the courage to say them. It’s a topic that author Kelly Corrigan talked about on Wednesday, Sept. 30, where CI had the honor of having her host a talk appropriately titled, “Hard Things I’m Learning to Say.” Without the help of the late Rachel Huff this would not have been possible.

Huff, former Crime Prevention & Community Involvement Coordinator and friend of Corrigan’s, played a large role in arranging her visit. This cast a forlorn, yet empowering setting as Corrigan covered a very important topic: empathy.

In her book, “Tell Me More,” Corrigan talks about how empathy is an important aspect in any relationship, whether it’s romantic or just a friendship. She went into further detail during her talk, explaining how it’s always best to understand where the person is coming from, to put yourself in their shoes and see how they may view a particular situation or scenario.

In fact, it was her 25th college reunion that gave her inspiration to write the book. While she was there, Corrigan struck up a conversation with an old college roommate who mentioned how everyone felt she was mean to a particular person. While it’s unclear how the situation played out or was resolved, Corrigan explained that we should never assume who people are. Once we have that perceived notion or image of who we think someone is or should be, we’ve already set ourselves up for disaster.

But that’s where humility comes in! As Corrigan mentioned, it allows us to step back before we give that perceived image of someone. Without humility we can harm those around us, going about our lives and never knowing the truth about someone.

As the event drew to a close with a Q&A session, Corrigan told a story of how every time she passes by elderly people she can’t help but imagine herself in their shoes: “When I see old people, I think, that’s just you, but later.”

If one thinks about it, there’s some truth to her words. No matter how strong or tough we feel today, in the end, “each of us will be in a position of weakness, in a position of where we need mercy.” We all rely on each other for support and comfort.

 

Latino Experience Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Experience

By Naomi Santana and Kim Lamb Gregory
naomi.santana152@myci.csuci.edu and kim.gregory@csuci.edu

  • LA/LA Broome Library art gallery by Jazzminn Morecraft
    LA/LA Broome Library art gallery by Jazzminn Morecraft

CI is participating in the Getty’s institutive Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA (PST: LA/LA), a wide-ranging and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. PST: LA/LA takes place from Sept. 2017 through Jan. 2018 at more than 70 cultural institutions across Southern California.

PST: LA/LA runs throughout Southern California with a series of visual arts displays, workshops, music, literature and cuisine. The Chicana/Chicano movement of the 1960s and 1970s, Mexican iconography and the ancient Aztec cosmic female deities are all a part of the art show at CI.

The exhibition at CI, “The Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture (1995-2000) Revisited,” is part of the collaboration of exhibits and presentations that reach from San Diego to Santa Barbara, and from Los Angeles to Palm Springs.

The Garland and Brenda Reiter Foundation and Reiter Affiliated Companies, a fresh berry producer headquartered in Ventura County, provided major support for CI’s exhibition. CI’s exhibits in Napa Gallery and the John Spoor Broome Library Gallery coincided with the grand opening of PST: LA/LA, which took place on Sept. 15, when many of the 70+ participating exhibits opened to the public.

On Thursday, Sept. 14 the public was invited to the grand opening reception at the John Spoor Broome Library archives courtyard on the CI campus from 5-8 p.m.

CI’s Napa Hall Gallery exhibit features Los Angeles artists Vibiana Aparicio-Chamberlin, Oscar Castillo and Leo Limon, who were all a part of the Latino Museum, Art & Culture exhibition in downtown Los Angeles.

The John Spoor Broome Library Gallery features the work of Cuban-born Paul Sierra, whose work integrates North American influences with his Latin visual and cultural roots.

Oscar Castillo is known for his photogenic documentation of the Chicana/o civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Castillo kept his lens trained on Vietnam War protests and other social movements in East Los Angeles. His passion for photography was inspired by the living contrast in Japan when he was stationed there as a U.S. Marine.

Leo Limon was born in Los Angeles to immigrant parents who fled Mexico during the 1910-1920 revolution. Limon was influenced by the social and political activism that occurred around him. His art integrates ancient indigenous culture with modern contemporary life in Los Angeles.

Vibiana Aparicio-Chamberlin is an artist and poet having grown up with the influence of her mother, a Mexican Yaqui storyteller and her father, a spiritual and intellectual Mexican Indian. Aparicio-Chamberlin’s subjects are mainly women, family and Mexican iconography with her poetry incorporated into her visual artwork.

Other PST: LA/LA events that will be hosted by CI include workshops, book-signings, a Day of the Dead performance and art installations, along with a film premier screening of the “Con Safos” documentary. Be sure to check out these art exhibits available on campus. For more information, visit www.csuci.edu/news/releases/2017-pacificstandard-la-la.htm.

CI is participating in the Getty’s institutive Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA (PST: LA/LA), a wide-ranging and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. PST: LA/LA takes place from Sept. 2017 through Jan. 2018 at more than 70 cultural institutions across Southern California.

PST: LA/LA runs throughout Southern California with a series of visual arts displays, workshops, music, literature and cuisine. The Chicana/Chicano movement of the 1960s and 1970s, Mexican iconography and the ancient Aztec cosmic female deities are all a part of the art show at CI.

The exhibition at CI, “The Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture (1995-2000) Revisited,” is part of the collaboration of exhibits and presentations that reach from San Diego to Santa Barbara, and from Los Angeles to Palm Springs.

The Garland and Brenda Reiter Foundation and Reiter Affiliated Companies, a fresh berry producer headquartered in Ventura County, provided major support for CI’s exhibition. CI’s exhibits in Napa Gallery and the John Spoor Broome Library Gallery coincided with the grand opening of PST: LA/LA, which took place on Sept. 15, when many of the 70+ participating exhibits opened to the public.

On Thursday, Sept. 14 the public was invited to the grand opening reception at the John Spoor Broome Library archives courtyard on the CI campus from 5-8 p.m.

CI’s Napa Hall Gallery exhibit features Los Angeles artists Vibiana Aparicio-Chamberlin, Oscar Castillo and Leo Limon, who were all a part of the Latino Museum, Art & Culture exhibition in downtown Los Angeles.

The John Spoor Broome Library Gallery features the work of Cuban-born Paul Sierra, whose work integrates North American influences with his Latin visual and cultural roots.

Oscar Castillo is known for his photogenic documentation of the Chicana/o civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Castillo kept his lens trained on Vietnam War protests and other social movements in East Los Angeles. His passion for photography was inspired by the living contrast in Japan when he was stationed there as a U.S. Marine.

Leo Limon was born in Los Angeles to immigrant parents who fled Mexico during the 1910-1920 revolution. Limon was influenced by the social and political activism that occurred around him. His art integrates ancient indigenous culture with modern contemporary life in Los Angeles.

Vibiana Aparicio-Chamberlin is an artist and poet having grown up with the influence of her mother, a Mexican Yaqui storyteller and her father, a spiritual and intellectual Mexican Indian. Aparicio-Chamberlin’s subjects are mainly women, family and Mexican iconography with her poetry incorporated into her visual artwork.

Other PST: LA/LA events that will be hosted by CI include workshops, book-signings, a Day of the Dead performance and art installations, along with a film premier screening of the “Con Safos” documentary. Be sure to check out these art exhibits available on campus. For more information, visit www.csuci.edu/news/releases/2017-pacificstandard-la-la.htm.

 

Looking on the Brighter Side of Life

By Jazzminn Morecraft
jazzminn.morecraft978@csuci.edu

When turning on the news, some things that might pop up are political disagreements, natural disasters and mass shootings, none of which are a light topic. I feel that it is easy to forget that there is still good out there when all that is promoted is grief and hostility.

Let’s take a step back and show how students are promoting acts of kindness and spreading it in other people’s lives:

“I picked up some of my drunk friends and drove them home.” – Anthony Vergot

“A girl had a seizure and I helped her. I got her a chair and some water and then called for help.” – Devin Rojas

“I usually visit Catholic charities in Moorpark. It’s for low income people and we give them baskets.” – Stephany Reyes

“I threw my grandma an eightieth birthday surprise party on Saturday. She was totally shocked and she had no clue.” – Karina Gonzalez

“I helped a girl with her stats homework. She was completely lost and I stayed after school until 11 p.m. to help her out.” – Alexandra Ekel

Remember that it does not matter how small or big the act of kindness is. All that matters is that it has impacted someone else’s life in some way.

 

Men’s Soccer Reaches for the Top This Season

By Jorge Garcia
jorge.garcia234@myci.csuci.edu

Men's Soccer photo credit to Jorge Garcia
Men’s Soccer photo credit to Jorge Garcia

CI’s Men’s Soccer Club is starting their season this fall semester. They are competing in the Division II SoCal Men’s league, promoted by the West Coast Soccer Association, in a league consisting of soccer teams from Southern California colleges. This is the third season in which CI’s Men’s Soccer is competing for this soccer association.

Captain Emmanuel Valdez, along with Alexandre Cartron, spoke about the team’s current momentum. They are both experienced players, with Valdez starting his third season and Cartron starting his second. Valdez, who plays as a right winger, has set high expectations for this team as he said, “I’ll tell you something, we are gonna be in the top three.”

Cartron, who is an offensive tackle, explained, “Basically, we had very good tryouts, so there is something in this team that is very good. We had the kind of players we want for every position, so we are safe.”

The two experienced players discussed the team’s strategy, which will consist of a formation of 4-5-1. Using four defenders, two center defensive midfielders and a tackle in the front, they will also have a winger on each side of the field and one forward to score. They also revealed that the team’s style for the season will be a counter-attacking style.

Valdez and Cartron also talked about their rivals in this league, in which they both confessed, “San Diego is the number one team.”

Furthermore, they revealed a specific team in this league that is considered to be their bitter rival: “Cal Poly (Pomona). I want to beat them,” Valdez said, and, smiling, Cartron added that, “They are a good team, and I want to destroy them… We want to show them who we are.”

All home games for men’s soccer will be played at the CI Potrero Fields on Saturdays at 2 p.m.

For more information, such as a schedule of their games and league standings, check the website www.westcoastsoccerassociation.com and, under clubs, click on CSU Channel Islands.

 

A New Offensive Team for Women’s Soccer

By Jorge Garcia
jorge.garcia234@myci.csuci.edu

Women's Soccer photo credit to Jorge Garcia
Women’s Soccer photo credit to Jorge Garcia

CI’s Women’s Soccer Club’s new competitive season starts this fall semester. They are competing in the Division II SoCal Women’s league, promoted by the West Coast Soccer Association. In the last season, women’s soccer gained a record of one victory and seven losses. However, the team captains, defender Leah Ostermann and midfielder Madison Totushek, have told The CI View about the team’s goals and current situation. Both players have been playing for CI soccer for four years.

Totushek gave her opinion about this league, which she considers a good opportunity for the club: “This is a good opportunity to play against other schools in California and play other top teams like USC, UCLA…(and CSU) Fresno. We get to play all these teams back potentially that were not in our division bracket.”

The team members revealed the team’s strategy formation, which will be a formation of 4-4-2, in which the left and right midfielders will open and move down the field to cross the forwards with the intention to score more goals. The captains hope better passing and better connection among the new team will help make their plans possible. When asked if this team was going to be more offensive than last season, Totushek said, “Absolutely, I can promise that.”

The position expected to be most competitive is center midfielder, as most players on the roster are playing this position. However, the position that the team is short on is the outside midfielder, because they run the most and get tired sooner. Still, they trust the roster. As Totushek says, “Every player is unique in their skills.”

This season the captains expect to win at least three games as they are moving the team up the ladder. Also, they hope to not have any injured players this season, since the team suffered four injuries last season.

For more information, such as a schedule of their games and league standings, check the website www.westcoastsoccerassociation.com and, under clubs, click on CSU Channel Islands.

 

CI Endurance Club: Run the Long Road

By Jorge Garcia
jorge.garcia234@myci.csuci.edu

Endurance Club photo credit to Jorge Garcia
Endurance Club photo credit to Jorge Garcia

The Endurance Club is expected to have a busy agenda for this fall semester on cross-country competitions. Though they are not competing in an official league, the competitions for this coming fall are still competitive. The club’s president, Maria Robles, talked with The CI View about the club agenda and the club’s current situation.

Robles expressed her thoughts about the competitions, stating that “intercollegiate teams are very difficult to compete (against).” Also, another change coming up for the club is that they will have a new coach, Jim Ortiz, for this season. “He was a former UCLA runner, and he continued to train,” Robles shared. “His daughter runs for Ventura High School, and he also coaches Santa Paula distance track.”

In addition to his experience, Robles shared her thoughts about having Ortiz as their new coach, stating: “I think we are extremely fortunate to have him, he has so much experience, so much knowledge. He understands the different types performance levels that the club has… He understands the importance of keeping our club social.”

The club’s upcoming competitions are very spirited and competitive as the club only selects five males and five females to compete. As Robles explained about the selection process for these competitions, “The top fastest scores will go… (This way) it’s fair for people who come to practice consistently.”

To learn more about the Endurance Club, find them on CI Sync or contact Maria Robles, the club’s president.

 

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